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CPAP Mask Sizing


Finding the right fit for the Comfort Full

Proper mask fitting is critical to ensuring that the ComfortFull will meet the patient's needs. Below are some guidelines to follow when fitting a patient with a ComfortFull mask.

Landmarks
  • Sides of mouth
  • Bridge of nose zone
  • Below lower lip (with mouth slightly open)
1. Begin with sizing gauge.
The integrated sizing gauge on the package:
  • Allows for quick and easy fitting.
  • Cuts down on mask waste by letting you determine the right mask size before you open the bag.
2. Check landmarks. Fit with mouth slighly open
as expected while sleeping.


3. Choose the smallest size that is wider than the
mouth and long enough to extend beyond the
lower lip.


4. Adjust forehead support arm so mask is
parallel to face. Tighten top straps of headgear,
then bottom. DO NOT over tighten straps.


5. Try the mask on with the unit at the prescribed
pressure to ensure proper fit.





Finding the right fit for the Comfort Gel

Proper mask fit is critical to ensuring that the ComfortClassic will meet the patient's needs. Below are some guidelines to follow when fitting a patient with a Comfort Gel Nazalmask.

Landmarks

a.) Sides of nostrils
b.) Bridge of nose zone
c.) Below the nose tip, above the lip

1. Begin with sizing gauge.
The integrated sizing gauge on the package:
  • Allows for quick and easy fitting.
  • Cuts down on mask waste by letting you determine the right mask size before you open the bag.
2. Check landmarks.

3. Choose the smallest mask that fits without
pinching or obstructing the nostrils.


4. Tighten top straps of headgear, then bottom.
DO NOT overtighten straps.


5. Try the mask on with the unit at the prescribed
pressure to ensure proper fit.



 


Overcoming Side Effects

As with most prescribed therapies, it is normal to experience some minor side effects. Below are a few suggestions that may help to alleviate some of the common side effects associated with positive airway pressure. If you continue to experience these side effects, or others not mentioned below, contact your home healthcare provider.

Skin Irritation/Red Marks

  • Mask Is Too Tight:
    • Loosen the headgear
    • Try another size
    • Try another type of mask
  • Mask Is Stiff from Age:
    • Replace it with a new one
  • Allergy to Mask Material:
    • Soak in hot soapy water and try again
  • Change to a different type mask material
    • Use a protective skin covering (e.g., moleskin or DuodermŪ)

Air Leaks

    • Adjust the forehead support arm (if applicable)
    • Adjust the headgear straps
    • Customize gel cushion (if applicable)
    • Adjust the forehead spacer (if applicable)
    • Try another mask size
    • Try another mask type

Runny Nose/Dryness/Congestion/Nosebleed

  • Ask your healthcare provider:
    • About adding a humidifier to your therapy device
    • To recommend a steroid-based topical nasal preparation To prescribe/recommend a nasal spray (prescription or over-the-counter) About other therapy modes (e.g., auto-CPAP or bi-level)



Additional Information

 Puritan Bennett

Fisher & Paykel

Table 1. Common problems reported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure and trouble-shooting guide

Problem

Possible Cause

Correction

Mask leaks.

Skin irritation.

Pressure sores or     blisters.

  1. Strap adjustment too loose or too tight.
  2. Incorrect mask size.
  3. Worn-out mask.
  4. Dirty mask.
  1. Readjust headgear straps. The mask should be as loose as possible while still creating a seal.
  2. Consult respiratory therapist for a mask fitting. Nasal pillows or full-face mask may provide a better fit.
  3. Inspect mask for stiffness, cracks or breaks. Replace mask if needed.
  4. Wash mask daily; wash face nightly.

Dry nose and/or throat.

Nasal congestion.

Epistaxis.

 

  1. Dry air.

 

  1. Try nasal saline spray before bedtime and upon awakening.

  2. Add heated humidification.
  3. Try topical nasal steroid preparation or antihistamines.
  4. May have some desensitization over time.
  5. Consult physician if symptoms persist.

Dry mouth.

  1. Sleeping with mouth open.
  1. Try a chin strap.
  2. If this is not helpful, a full-face mask may be considered.
  3. Add heated humidification.

Sore, dry, irritated or swollen eyes; conjunctivitis.

  1. Mask leaks.
  2. Mask too tight.
  1. Try reseating the mask on the face.

  2. Readjust headgear straps.
  3. Inspect mask for stiffness, cracks or breaks. Replace mask if needed.
  4. Use an eye patch.

Rhinorrhea.

  1. Dry air.
  1. Try saline nasal spray before bedtime.

  2. Try topical nasal steroid preparation or intranasal ipratropium bromide before bedtime.
  3. Add heated humidification.

Allergic rhinitis.

  1. Irritants drawn in with room air through machine.

 

  1. Place unit on bedside table to keep dust and/or animal hairs out of machine.

  2. Consult respiratory therapist: a fine particulate filter can be added to some units.
  3. Add heated humidification.
  4. Consult physician if symptoms persist (may require medication).

Chest discomfort.

Aerophagia.

Sinus discomfort.

Difficulty exhaling.

  1. Pressure requirement may be lower at beginning of sleep period.
  2. Initial adjustment period.

 

  1. Try pressure ramp at beginning of sleep period.

  2. Reduce pressure with bilevel positive airway pressure.
  3. Try to reduce pressure requirement by using oral appliance and CPAP (no data available).

CPAP unit too noisy.

  1. Blocked air intake.
  2. Too close to sleeping area.
  1. Check if air filter is clean and not blocked by outside items.

  2. Add a length of hose and place unit farther away.

Bed partner intolerance.

  1. Multiple factors (noise, anxiety).

 

  1. Promote education of the patient and bed partner.
  2. Recommend attending a patient support group (i.e., A.W.A.K.E. Network of the American Sleep Apnea Association).

 

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